19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy

19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy 19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy
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19th Century English Coromandel And Brass Tea Caddy

Price: £1,000
This is a fine antique Victorian domed top twin tea caddy made by the esteemed box maker Toulmin & Gale, circa 1860 in date.
 
It is beautifully decorated with cut brass flowing foliate cartouche cresting to the figured coromandel wood.
 
The box has a hinged top which opens to reveal a central heavy set cut glass blender flanked by two domed lidded canisters for black and green tea, bears brass retailer's label Toulmin & Gale, 7 New Bond Street, set on a plinth base with canted edge.

Height 22cm

Width 36cm

Depth 18cm

The Toulmin & Gale company was originally established in 1735. By 1845, Joseph Toulmin and John Gale were in control of the company, based at 85-86 Cheapside, London.

They were awarded a prize medal for ‘excellence of material and workmanship’ for their dressing cases at the International Exhibition of 1862. A year later, the company had expanded and opened up a new manufactory at 18 Sise Lane, London and a further shop at 7 New Bond Street, London.
Toulmin & Gale were finally declared bankrupt in 1876. Interestingly, George William Betjemann was one of the trustees under their liquidation and this business continued as Betjemann & Gale Ltd.
By 1878, the name of Toulmin & Gale was trading again, with Joseph Toulmin at the helm. Based from 10 Cornhill, London, the business advertised itself as being ‘Late of Cheapside and New Bond Street’.
Early 1884 saw Joseph Toulmin deciding to discontinue the retail side of business, instead choosing to supervise the manufacture of products for James Hurry’s leather goods department based at 47 Cornhill, London.  

 

 

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